Prem Geet 2: Hope for true love, hope for better films

August 1, 2017 12:00 PM Republica


Though set in Burma, ‘Prem Geet 2’ from the very start talks about nationalism and tries to promote the rich culture of Nepal throughout the film. The story gradually develops plot with a good five minutes of speech on nationalism and the brave Gorkhalis who fought beyond the national border.

Debutant Aslesha Thakuri (Geet) appears on the screen as a Nepali who has never been to her homeland. Despite that, Geet has an immense love for the country and desperately wants to come to Nepal. She plays a naïve character, and eventually runs away from Burma to come to Murma, in Mugu of Nepal.

Audiences will get a good hearty laugh when Pradeep Khadka (Prem) makes his ‘beautiful’ entry on the screen. He works as a salesperson, and is a lady charmer. It’s not love at the first sight between Prem and Geet, but he certainly chases her around the streets of Kathmandu (literally) and the scene will definitely make audiences laugh out loud. The storyline does not impose Prem and Geet’s love story, however, to many it may seem boring as the two love birds take their sweet time to know each other and fall in love.

Khadka is comparatively convincing as actor, while debutant Thakuri still has a lot to work on in terms of her acting and expressions. With a charming face, Khadka has done a fairly convincing job to justify his character. But Aslesha’s dialogue delivery was not impressive enough, and at times it even seemed fake and sloppy.
All the songs in the film are good and one can hum along the tunes. And in the Nepali tunes of ‘Motorcycle Maa’ you can find the mixture of an American country style hoedown.

If there is one thing that would leave an impression on you, that is the movie’s incredible cinematography. It has given the Nepali film industry a ray of hope to compete against international film industries in the near future. From the mesmerizing sceneries of Rara Lake in ‘Bistarai Bistarai’ to the way the title song ‘Prem Geet’ has been shot in Thailand, it’s a job well done. A big thumbs-up to cinematographer Purushottam Pradhan.
Though the first-half of the movie is comparatively slow, the second-half gets a sudden hype with producer Santosh Sen’s smashing entry. Debuting in the film, Sen (Angad) is a fighter who is trained in Muay Thai kickboxing in Thailand.

Angad becomes the biggest obstacle between Prem and Geet, and fights tooth and nail to keep them apart. But, Prem is not the one to give up. The fight scene between Khadka and Sen has been well-choreographed and was probably one of the more natural fight scenes in Nepali movies.

There is always room for improvement, but Prem Geet 2 is worth a watch, and can be a landmark for Nepali movie industry.

 


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