LONDON, Feb 19: Japanese car maker Honda is set to announce it’s closing its only British car plant in 2022 with the loss of 3,500 jobs, a lawmaker told Reuters, in the latest blow to the UK car industry as Brexit approaches.

Smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day can damage your vision, a study co-authored by a Rutgers researcher finds.

The immune system is incredibly important, thanks to its role in fighting off dangerous invaders in our bodies. But sometimes it gets it wrong, targeting harmless proteins from things like nuts or dairy products and triggering allergic reactions that ironically can themselves be fatal. Now, researchers from Michigan State University have identified a mechanism that helps keep the immune system in check, potentially paving the way for drugs that could prevent allergic reactions before they start.

A high-protein, low-calorie diet helps older adults with obesity lose more weight, maintain more muscle mass, improve bone quality and lose "bad" fat, according to results from a new randomized controlled trial led by Wake Forest University researcher Kristen Beavers.

Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement.

LONDON, Feb 18: Britain's richest man has been slammed for plans to move to Monaco to save billions in tax less than a year after being knighted.

New fabrics being grown in laboratories may provide a viable alternative to the materials currently shedding vast quantities of plastic into the world’s oceans.

Making the decision to operate on a baby or toddler can be complex and confronting for parents. It involves weighing the risks versus the expected benefits for the child.

A recent study by Vanderbilt researchers of 11 counties in Middle Tennessee revealed that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were nearly 2.5 times more likely than children without ASD to be reported to the Child Abuse Hotline by the age of 8.

Children with thin tooth enamel are more likely to develop mental health problems in later life, a new study finds. Researchers have analysed the milk teeth lost by primary school children and found that they could offer vital clues to their future happiness. Tooth scans could one day be used to flag up – and potentially head off – children at high risk of health problems further down the road, they say.