Neither balancing nor bandwagoning

March 10, 2020 09:14 am

Most international relations theories view the world and the politics that surrounds it through materialistic Eurocentric lens. They measure the politics and foreign policy of global south in the standard set by the Euro-centric discipline and keep politics, foreign policy choices and the worldview of smaller states under the shadowed corner of global political calculations. Realistic school of International Relations led by Kenneth Waltz, John Mearsheimer and Randall Schwedler argues that small nations like Nepal would either bandwagon or balance against the powerful neighboring states.  But the history and politics of South Asian countries show a different trajectory.

Hope and expectation

March 9, 2020 09:30 am

The newly appointed Indian Ambassador to Nepal, Vinay Mohan Kwatra has arrived in Kathmandu. He was leading the Indian diplomatic mission in France when the Indian government handed him the Nepal job. He boasts more than a three decade long experience in the Indian Foreign Service (IFS). He was serving as the head of Americas Division in the Foreign Ministry where he dealt with India’s relations with the United States and Canada when Prime Minister Narendra Modi came to power.

KATHMANDU, Oct 27: Prime Minister KP Oli, who is currently in Azerbaijan to participate in the 18th Summit of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), has held meetings with various heads of state and government including those from Venezuela and North Korea.

Anatomy of coming recession

August 27, 2019 00:25 am

NEW YORK – There are three negative supply shocks that could trigger a global recession by 2020. All of them reflect political factors affecting international relations, two involve China, and the United States is at the center of each. Moreover, none of them is amenable to the traditional tools of countercyclical macroeconomic policy.

Will democracy die last?

August 25, 2019 01:05 am

PARIS – In the late 1970s and early 1980s, prominent international relations experts such as the late French political philosopher Pierre Hassner argued that the world was witnessing a process of competitive decay between the United States and the Soviet Union. For the latter, the conflict in Afghanistan was about to become an even costlier failure than the Vietnam war had been for America. By 1989, the verdict was clear: The Soviet Union had atrophied much faster than the US, and its empire collapsed, the victim of its own errors and contradictions.