Good Reads

November 2, 2018 11:15 AM The Week Bureau


Hostage, The Wayward Daughter and Sea Prayer

Hostage by Greta Rana 
Price: Rs 560

Hari Prasad, a boatman living by the banks of the Rapti in the plains of Nepal, is saddled with debts and responsibility for his three children and wife. Left with no other option, he seeks employment in the Gulf. After five years of working at a resort in a desert near Dubai, he is able to pay off his loans, reclaim his ancestral land, put his children through school, and return home. But when he witnesses the terror that has crept into everyday life in Nepal due to tensions between the government and Maoist factions, he considers returning to the higher-paying job in Jordan. Hari Prasad leaves, unaware of the fate awaiting him there. Written with rare sensitivity and a keen understanding of the lives of poor migrant workers, Hostage is the moving story of one of the thousands who flee the social and political upheaval of their country in search of a better life.

The Wayward Daughter by Shradha Ghale 
Price: Rs 560

Sumnima Tamule is in a crisis. Her friends at Rhododendron High School—all girls from semi-royal and other rich families—will soon be going abroad, but she, with second-division marks in her final exams, might have to settle for a grimy little college in town. Her parents, plodding away in middle-class Kathmandu, are deeply disappointed, and all their hopes are now pinned on Numa, her sister. Sundry cousins from their village in far-off Lungla—driven out by poverty and the warring Maoists—come to live with the family, trample upon her privacy, and wage kitchen politics with Boju, her foul-tongued grandmother. Other relatives embarrass her with their gauche village ways. And, worst of all, Sagar, Sumnima’s US-returned RJ boyfriend, for whom she has been lying, sneaking around and stealing money from home, keeps her waiting for his phone calls. 

Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseni
Price: Rs 798

On a moonlit beach a father cradles his sleeping son as they wait for dawn to break and a boat to arrive. He speaks to his boy of the long summers of his childhood, recalling his grandfather’s house in Syria, the stirring of olive trees in the breeze, the bleating of his grandmother’s goat, the clanking of her cooking pots. And he remembers, too, the bustling city of Homs with its crowded lanes. When the sun rises, they and those around them will gather their possessions and embark on a perilous sea journey in search of a new home. This is a heart-wrenching story from the international bestselling author of The Kite Runner. Hosseini has that rare thing, a Dickensian knack for storytelling. He excels at writing suspenseful epics filled with compelling characters and Sea Prayer establishes him as a master storyteller. 


Leave A Comment