CIEDP seeks one-year term extension

February 1, 2018 06:45 AM Republica


KATHMANDU, Feb 1: Two weeks after the government endorsed an ordinance clearing legal hurdles to extend the tenure of the Commission for Investigation on Enforced Disappeared Persons (CIEDP), the transitional justice body on Wednesday wrote to the government urging the latter to increase its term by one year. CIEDP's term will expire on February 9.

In a letter addressed to the Ministry of Peace and Reconstruction, CIEDP has also demanded guarantee of adequate resources for its regular functioning and to carry out works assigned by the law. 

CIEDP Commissioner Lokendra Mallick told Republica that the commission requested the government to extend the tenure by one year after leaders of three major parties expressed readiness to ensure required resources to the understaffed transitional justice body.  

"It would be meaningless to extend the tenure of the commission unless the government provides manpower and resources we need. We have clearly stated that in our request," said Mallick. 

Based on the request, the MoPR will send a proposal to a cabinet meeting demanding a one-year increase in its term. 

Despite spending three years, CIEDP has barely completed around 10 percent works assigned to it. The commission is yet to begin probe into over 2,000 cases relating to those disappeared by the Maoists and government during the armed insurgency. 


If the proposal gets approved, it will be the second such term extension of the commission which was set up in February 2015 with the initial tenure of two years. Together with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), the government had last extended the CIEDP's term for a year on February 9, 2017.  

Mallick said the commission decided to seek extension of the term after leaders of three major parties expressed commitment to provide necessary support. CIEDP team had met Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba on Sunday, UML Chairman KP Sharma Oli on Monday and CPN (Maoist Center) Chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal on Tuesday. 

"All three party leaders expressed their support to the commission. UML Chairman Oli said that the new government would do everything to help the commission to complete its assigned works and wrap up the remaining works of peace process," said Mallick. 

Despite spending three years, CIEDP has barely completed around 10 percent works assigned to it. The commission is yet to begin probe into over 2,000 cases relating to those disappeared by the Maoists and government during the armed insurgency. 

The CIEDP has received over 3,000 complaints of which around 2,258 cases have been verified and forwarded for compensation as ensured by the law. Families of the disappeared and people who died during the Maoist rebellion are entitled to Rs 1 million in compensation. The commission has proposed the government to double the compensation amount to Rs 2 million. 

Mallick said that lack of support from the government was to be blamed for the CIEDP's failure. 

"The government's apathy to clear legal complications and provide necessary logistical support has paralyzed the commission. We are not in a mood to continue if things remain like this for long," said Mallick. 

Mallick said the required laws should be put into place first for the commission to resume its works.  Despite a ruling by the Supreme Court to criminalize torture and disappearance and remove the statute of limitation for registering conflict-era cases, the government has shown indifference to amend the Enforced Disappearances Enquiry, Truth and Reconciliation Commission Act in line with the apex court's order.  The current act includes provisions which experts, families of the victims and human rights defenders say allows amnesty to perpetrators of serious human rights violation. 


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